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Posts Tagged ‘recipe’

So, I haven’t posted in AGES (I’m too scared to go check JUST how long that has been…) but after I announced my somewhat geeky flowchart diagramming of “what to do with leftover citrus rinds”, some people expressed an interest 🙂 so here it is! This was inspired by @HipGirls great post , which is full of many great ways to use up those peels – yummy, useful and efficient ways to create less waste. SCORE! I didn’t include all the items (just the main ones of interest to me) but this should be a good visual addendum – post it in your kitchen and let me know how it goes. 😀

Maybe next I will post the one I did for the kids – now required to be followed for all ipad time requests. It’s pretty new, so no word yet on whether this has succeeding in cutting down whining…but I am ever hopeful!

CitrusFlowchart

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Making banana-based raw “ice creams” is extremely simple. You just need a blender or food processor, a freezer, and some fruit.

Step 1: Peel and freeze a good bunch of extremely ripe bananas. You want them to be nice and speckly brown at minimum. Keep in mind a mushy texture will not matter as you are blending them anyway.

Step 2: Do the same with whatever fruit you choose to add. Note: Plain banana is delicious too! I add cinnamon and nutmeg to banana-only for that extra oomph.

Prepping fruit for freezer

Prepping fruit for freezer

Step 3: Wait until everything is nice and frozen. Then take it out and put it in the blender or food processor.

Ready to blend

Ready to blend



Step 4:
Blend. You may need to stop it once or twice and use a spoon to get it started blending, and/or add a small amount of water (I usually don’t).
All blended

All blended



Step 5:
Stick it back in the freezer to solidify a bit more.
I have the lid somewhere around here...

I have the lid somewhere around here...

Step 6: Enjoy your delicious totally guilt-free frozen treat!
Strawberry "Ice Cream"

Tri-color sherbert raw style! Kiwi, mango and strawberry. Delicious!

Tri-color sherbert raw style! Kiwi, mango and strawberry. Delicious!

YUM!

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Cold-Brewed Coffee

Coldbrewed coffee is easy to do, and delicious to enjoy. Now, technically, I am not supposed to have any (coffee being roasted) but I do make limited exception for coldbrewed coffee – but it has to be coldbrewed, because if I am going to have coffee it had better be AMAZINGLY good. Luckily, coldbrewed is up to the task. 🙂

I first heard about coldbrewed coffee in a New York Times article, I would guess three or so years ago. Of course, I googled it, and found some interesting things being said about it, including that it was less acidic than hot brew coffee. I was intrigued, and I decided to try it. Now, while they sell a few “machines” to do this for you, I am cheap frugal. The websites I googled turned up instructions for making my own device utilizing a large plastic drinking cup, and poking numerous holes in it to drain the coffee through. Eh, still too involved for me. So I read over the instructions again, decided what it basically boiled down to were two steps (soak, and filter), and came up with the following super simple process.

First, you get a large jar or other container. Toss in ground coffee and water in proportions of 1:4, for instance here I used 1 cup of coffee to 4 cups of water (and barely fit the jar! Note to self: next time, a smidge less, hmm?) You can stir it if you want. I put the lid on and shook it once. Then you set it on the counter. Total time: 1-2 minutes, depending on whether you had to find a jar.

Now, just leave it. Ignore it until morning, or whenever the next day you remember about it. If you’re in waaayyyy too much of a rush to filter it and it’s been out for a LONG time, stick it in the fridge until you get home.

When you’re ready to filter it (this will take 4-5 minutes), you will need two more containers. I used jars (what can I say, I have a lot) but you could use bowls, large cups, really anything. You will also need a mesh strainer and a coffee filter and funnel (or an espresso press basket thingy, which I found in my closet of all things!). You could in theory use the filter for the whole process, but I find it much easier to use the strainer for all the large particles as that speeds up the process considerably. And while I don’t mind spending 4 minutes straining the coffee, 10 or more starts to really push it, and I just won’t do it LOL.

As it happened, both the strainer that I used and the espresso press that I used to filter the coffee fit perfectly into my jars.

The process is pretty easy. Strain the coffee through the strainer first, discarding the grounds each time as it gets full (coffee grounds are GREAT for the compost by the way!)

Step One

Step One

Then, take your once-strained mixture and put it through your coffee filter (or espresso basket thingy).

Step two

Step two

Then, ENJOY! I love mine cold, but I hear you *can* heat it up if you want to. It’s pretty damn strong, so you can dilute it a bit with water if you like, or just add extra cream/milk/soy/etc (my preference by far). What you have now is a drink that makes clear to you how Kahlua can be a coffee liquor and yet taste of chocolate! Bliss.

And if you love it, and want to enjoy it often, just do this to avoid the day-long wait: when you finish filtering it, immediately start a new batch…voila, no wait!

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